How to save money and make your editor or proofreader happy

You’re a self-publishing author? You’re on a limited budget. You want to make the most of editing and proofreading.

Here are five simple ways that you can do to make the most of any editorial experience.

I still haven’t found what I’m looking for

Oh no! I’ve just realised thatfor the last eighteen chapters of misspelt the London Borough of Haringey as Harringay (a district within that same borough – it’s just asking for trouble isn’t it!).

Doing it proper: using capitals properly for people

We all know that names need capital letters. My name is Nick. See, there’s the capital ‘N’. I’m so important that I get a capital letter at the beginning of my name. That’s an easy example but it’s not always straightforward.

Can you have the perfect manuscript?

Is getting your manuscript perfect stopping you from moving forwards with it? Is a fear of it “not being right” preventing you from submitting to agents and publishers or even self-publishing?
Here’s why the dream of “perfection” might be holding you back and why good enough, is good enough.

No work? No problem!

Life as a freelance editor and proofreader can be unpredictable. From times of feeling swamped with work and under pressure to get it all done to worries about the future as you having nothing in your inbox.

How do you cope with the down time and what do you do to fill the schedule in the quiet periods?

How to understand my editing

Editors and proofreaders all work ever so slightly differently, especially when working with Word documents. Here is a quick guide to what all the marks on your manuscript mean. If there’s anything that doesn’t make sense, is confusing, or you are unsure of, always ask. I am always happy to answer questions.